Continence & Women’s Health

Both men and women can experience bladder problems and other symptoms of pelvic floor weakness related to urological or gynaecological conditions or operations, which can be eased with specialist physiotherapy. Women can be particularly vulnerable to urinary incontinence and other symptoms related to their pelvic floor muscles when they are pregnant, postnatally, around the menopause and as they get older.

Therapist: Gill Brook

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Gill Brook BSc(hons), MCSP, HCPC, MAACP, PhysioFirst

Chelsea RecepetionGill has specialized in pelvic floor, continence (including men) and women’s health physiotherapy for 24 years and currently works with hospital in and outpatients.

In addition, she teaches and tutors at postgraduate level for the University of Bradford.

She has lectured nationally and internationally, written several book chapters, academic papers and articles and is currently secretary of the International Organization of Physical Therapists in Women’s Health.

In recent years, Gill has been asked to advise the public and media on the role of physiotherapy for people with urinary incontinence. In particular, pelvic floor muscle training which has been shown by research to benefit the majority of women with stress urinary incontinence (leaks with coughs, sneezes, etc) and is recommended by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) as an early intervention.

Gill offers treatment for a range of conditions such as stress or urge urinary incontinence (urine loss); prolapse (a feeling of heaviness, pressure or bulging in the vagina); anal incontinence (loss of stool or wind); and other symptoms of weak pelvic floor muscles (e.g. sexual dysfunction).

Women can be particularly vulnerable to urinary incontinence and other symptoms related to their pelvic floor muscles when they are pregnant, postnatally, around the menopause and as they get older and Gill will be happy to offer advice and treatment designed to meet the needs of the individual.

Both men and women can experience bladder problems and other symptoms of pelvic floor weakness related to urological or gynaecological conditions or operations, which can be eased with specialist physiotherapy such as that offered by Gill.

Assessment will involve a lot of questions about medical history, background to the problem, current symptoms, and normally a physical examination (with your consent). We would then agree our goals and discuss appropriate treatment. This might include specific and holistic advice, appropriate exercise, and additional therapies such as biofeedback and nerve stimulation.

Gill Brook is available to see patients at The Valley Clinic in Ilkley by special appointment.

Click for MapPlease call 07703 192 907 for more information on Continence & Woman’s Health or to book an appointment directly with Gill Brook.

Pelvic Floor Muscles refer to the group of muscles in the lower part of the abdomen which support the pelvic organs (bladder, bowel and uterus) and span the bottom of the pelvis. These muscles control the sphincters which allow us to control our bladder and bowel. Pelvic floor muscles are also important for sexual function in males and females.

Involuntary urination, is any leakage of urine or fecal matter. It can be a common and distressing problem, which may have a profound impact on quality of life. Urinary incontinence almost always results from an underlying treatable medical condition but is under-reported to medical practitioners.

Prolapse literally means “to fall out of place‚” from the Latin prolabi meaning “to fall out.” In medicine, prolapse is a condition where organs, such as the uterus, fall down or slip out of place. It is used for organs protruding through the vagina or the rectum or for the misalignment of the valves of the heart.

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